Brazilian billionaires’ club loses 23 members

Forbes released its 2016 World’s Billionaires ranking, and given the global economic turmoil of late, it shouldn’t be surprising that 221 people fell off the list. Brazil lost 23 billionaires — the third biggest drop after China (42) and the U.S. (25).

For better or worse, a look at the list of Brazil’s former billionaires doesn’t reveal any clear trends: their diminished fortunes came from industries as varied as banking, agribusiness, retail, pharma and media. Among the notable billionaires’ club departures are Rubens Ometto, a onetime sugar and ethanol titan whose Cosan lost 62% of its value over a year; and Edir Macedo, a controversial evangelical leader and owner of the Rede Record broadcast network. It’s also worth noting that despite his much-publicized downfall, former BTG Pactual CEO André Esteves plummeted 493 places in the list but is still a billionaire.

There are still 31 billionaires who call Brazil home, putting it in a tie with South Korea for 12th place in the list of countries with the biggest billionaire populations. Brazil’s BRIC counterparts fared much better: China has 251 billionaires, India 84 and Russia 77.  Brazil’s billionaires have a combined net worth of $135.1 billion, compared with $282.4 billion for India’s, $282.6 billion for Russia’s, and $593 billion for China’s.

Jorge Paulo Lemann (pictured below with wife Susanna) is still Brazil’s richest man and the 19th richest in the world, up seven places from last year.

Forbes estimates Lemann’s net worth to be $27.8 billion, which the publication attributes to his co-ownership of Anheuser-Busch InBev, the world’s biggest brewer, in addition to Heinz, Burger Kin and, Canada’s Tim Hortons restaurant chain. His partners in privately held 3G Capital, Marcel Telles and Carlos Alberto Sicupira, are No. 3 and No. 4 in the list of Brazil’s richest.

Brazil’s billionaires

  1. Jorge Paulo Lemann — $ 27.8 billions (3G Capital)
  2. Joseph Safra — $ 17.2 billions (Safra Bank)
  3. Marcel Telles — $ 13 billions (3G Capital)
  4. Carlos Alberto Sicupira — $ 11.3 billions (3G Capital)
  5. Eduardo Saverin — $ 6.2 billions (Facebook co-founder)
  6. João Roberto Marinho — $ 4.3 billions (Grupo Globo – media)
  7. José Roberto Marinho — $ 4.3 billions (Grupo Globo – media)
  8. Roberto Irineu Marinho — $ 4.3 billions (Grupo Globo – media)
  9. Abilio Diniz — $ 3.4 billions (BRF/Carrefour)
  10. Jorge Moll Filho — $ 3 billions (Rede D’Or – healthcare)
  11. Fernando Roberto Moreira Salles — $ 2.8 billions (Itaú Unibanco)
  12. João Moreira Salles — $ 2.8 billions (Itaú Unibanco)
  13. Pedro Moreira Salles — $ 2.8 billions (Itaú Unibanco)
  14. Walther Moreira Salles — $ 2.8 billions (Itaú Unibanco)
  15. Walter Faria — $ 2.6 billions (Grupo Petrópolis – brewery)
  16. José Luís Cutrale — $ 2.5 billions (Cutrale – produce)
  17. Francisco Ivens de Sá Dias Branco — $ 2.1 billions (M. Dias Branco – foodmaker)
  18. Rossana Camargo de Arruda Botelho — $ 1.9 billion (Camargo Corrêa – construction)
  19. Edson de Godoy Bueno — $ 1.9 billion (Amil – insurance)
  20. Aloysio de Andrade Faria — $ 1.9 billion (Banco Alfa – banking)
  21. Renata de Camargo Nascimento — $ 1.9 billion (Camargo Corrêa – construction)
  22. Regina de Camargo Pires Oliveira Dias — $ 1.9 billion (Camargo Corrêa – construction)
  23. Carlos Sanchez — $ 1.67 billion (EMS – pharmaceuticals)
  24. Júlio Bozano — $ 1.6 billion (Bozano Investimentos – investment bank)
  25. André Esteves — $ 1.6 billion (BTG Pactual – investment bank)
  26. Alexandre Grendene Bartelle — $ 1.6 billion (Grendene – shoes)
  27. Miguel Krigsner — $ 1.6 billion (O Boticário – cosmetics)
  28. Ermirio Pereira de Moraes — $ 1.1 billion (Votorantim – steel)
  29. Maria Helena Moraes Scripilliti — $ 1.1 billion (Votorantim – steel)
  30. Lírio Parisotto — $ 1.1 billion (Videolar-Innova – petrochemicals)
  31. Alfredo Egydio Arruda Villela filho — $ 1 billion (Itaú Unibanco – banking)

Former billionaires

  • Dulce Pugliese de Godoy Bueno (Amil – insurance)
  • Ana Lucia de Mattos Barretto Villela (Itaú Unibanco)
  • Lina Maria Aguiar (Bradesco – banking)
  • Sergio Lins Andrade (Andrade Gutierrez – construction)
  • Jayme Garfinkel (Porto Seguro – insurance)
  • Ana Maria Marcondes Penido Sant’Anna (CCR – construction)
  • Rubens Ometto Silveira Mello (Cosan – ethanol)
  • Nevaldo Rocha (Riachuelo – shoes)
  • Antônio Luiz Seabra (Natura – cosmetics)
  • Michael Klein (Via Varejo – retail)
  • José Isaac Peres and wife (Multiplan – real estate)
  • Lia Maria Aguiar (Bradesco – banking)
  • João Alves de Queiroz Filho (Hypermarcas – pharmaceuticals)
  • Itamar Locks (Grupo AMaggi – agribusiness)
  • Blairo Maggi (Grupo AMaggi – agribusiness)
  • Lucia Maggi (Grupo AMaggi – agribusiness)
  • Maurizio Billi (Eurofarma – pharmaceuticals)
  • Edir Macedo (Record -media)
  • Marli Pissollo (Grupo AMaggi – agribusiness)
  • Maria de Lourdes Egydio Villela (Itaú Unibanco)
  • Daisy Igel (Grupo Ultra – petrochemicals)
  • Liu Ming Chung (Nine Dragons – paper)
  • Hugo Ribeiro (Grupo AMaggi – agribusiness)

Written by Sergio Barreto

Brazilian-American editor, web developer and (occasional) event promoter. As founder and content director for this site, I keep an eye on what's wrong with Brazil, but what really makes my heart beat faster is sharing the exciting things happening in Brazilian tech, music, film, and other creative industries.

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